The warmer weather offers fraudsters new opportunities to get people to part with their money or personal information.

Just because it’s summer doesn’t mean scammers are taking a break. In fact, there are several cons that surface during the warmer months. Here are five scams that are common in the summer and steps you can take to avoid them.

Disaster-relief scams. If the hurricane that’s headed toward the North Carolina coast — Hurricane Arthur — does hit land and cause destruction, there’s a good chance con artists will use it as an opportunity to take advantage of people. A variety of scams pop up after most major disasters, says Adam Levin, founder of Identity Theft 911 and Credit.com. For example, after Superstorm Sandy hit the East Coast in 2012, fraudulent charities and relief efforts surfaced along with several other cons aimed at taking advantage of disaster victims. If this summer’s storm season does result in disasters, don’t give to charities that spring up to deal with them. Instead, check CharityNavigator.org for a list of legitimate organizations that have experience providing disaster relief.

Travel scams. There are several travel-related scams, but two of the most common are free cruise and vacation rental scams, says Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of Identity Theft Resource Center. Victims of the cruise scam typically are contacted by phone, e-mail or text message and offered a free cruise that actually isn’t free. People have to pay a variety of fees to book the cruise and, in the process, have to give up a lot of personal information — which is then sold, Velasquez says. If you want to take a cruise, skip the free offers and, instead, follow these five steps to get a cruise deal.

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With rental scams, con artists list properties that they don’t own on Craigslist or other sites that don’t vet posts. Then they take people’s money and leave them without a place to stay, Velasquez says. If the person listing a vacation rental will only communicate by e-mail, won’t show you the property in advance or asks you to wire money, she says it’s likely a scam. For tips on renting an apartment, condo or house when you travel, see How to Save Money on Vacation Rental Properties. For more information on avoiding travel scams, see How to Avoid Getting Ripped Off While Traveling.

Home-repair scams. When the weather gets warm, homeowners are more likely to get a knock on the door from someone offering to do repair work at a low price. Usually, they’ll claim that they’ve done paving or roofing for someone else in the neighborhood and have extra materials they’re willing to unload for cheap, Velasquez says. These traveling repairmen typically aren’t licensed and do shoddy work, she says. So when it comes to home improvement, you should always pick the contractor — don’t let them pick you. For more information, seeHome Remodeling Done Right.

Ticket scams. Scammers know how pricey tickets to concerts, sporting events and festivals can be, so they try to take advantage of people looking for deals. In particular, they often offer reasonably priced tickets to sold-out events, Velasquez says. They’ll take your cash and leave you empty-handed. To avoid paying for tickets that don’t exist, Levin of Identity Theft 911 says that you always should purchase tickets through the venue or Web site sanctioned to sell tickets — not through an unknown third party. For tips on seeing performances and events at discounted prices, check out How to Save Money on Concerts, Sports and More.

Read more: 5 Summer Scams to Avoid

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